The Add-on SDK is now in Firefox

We’re now a big step closer to shipping the SDK APIs with Firefox and other apps, we’ve uplifted the SDK code from our git repository to mozilla-inbound and assuming it sticks we will be on the trains for releasing. We’ll be doing weekly uplifts to keep the code in mozilla-central current.

What’s changed?

Not a lot yet. Existing add-ons and add-ons built with the current version of the SDK still use their own versions of the APIs from their XPIs. Add-ons built with the next version of the SDK may start to try to use the APIs in Firefox in preference to those shipped with the XPI and then a future version will only use those in Firefox. We’re also talking about the possibility of making Firefox override the APIs in any SDK based add-on and use the shipped ones automatically so the add-on author wouldn’t need to do anything.

We’re working on getting the Jetpack tests running on tinderbox switched over to use the in-tree code, once we do we will be unhiding them so other developers can immediately see when their changes break the SDK code. You can now run the Jetpack tests with a mach command or just with make jetpack-tests from the object directory. Those commands are a bit rudimentary right now, they don’t give you a way to choose individual tests to run. We’ll get to that.

Can I use it now?

If you’re brave, sure. Once a build including the SDKs is out (might be a day or so for nightlies) fire up a chrome context scratch pad and put this code in it:

var { Loader } = Components.utils.import("resource://gre/modules/commonjs/toolkit/loader.js", {});
var loader = Loader.Loader({
  paths: {
    "sdk/": "resource://gre/modules/commonjs/sdk/",
    "": "globals:///"
  },
  resolve: function(id, base) {
    if (id == "chrome" || id.startsWith("@"))
      return id;
    return Loader.resolve(id, base);
  }
});
var module = Loader.Module("main", "scratchpad://");
var require = Loader.Require(loader, module);

var { notify } = require("sdk/notifications");
notify({
  text: "Hello from the SDK!"
});

Everything but the last 4 lines sets up the SDK loader so it knows where to get the APIs from and creates you a require function to call. The rest can just be code as you’d include in an SDK add-on. You probably shouldn’t use this for anything serious yet, in fact I haven’t included the code to tell the module loader to unload so this code example may leak things for the rest of the life of the application.

This is too long of course (longer than it should be right now because of a bug too) so one thing we’ll probably do is create a simple JSM that can give you a require function in one line as well as take care of unloading when the app goes away.

2 thoughts on “The Add-on SDK is now in Firefox

  1. Cool! I look forward to memory leak fixes in the SDK being automatically propagated into add-ons that use the SDK.

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