Hacking on Tilt

Tilt, or 3D view as it is known in Firefox, is an awesome visual tool that really lets you see the structure of a webpage. It shows you just how deep your tag hierarchy goes which might give signs of your page being too complex or even help you spot errors in your markup that you wouldn’t otherwise notice. But what if it could do more? What if there were different ways to visualise the same page? What if even web developers could create their own visualisations?

I’ve had this idea knocking around in my head for a while now and the devtools work week was the perfect time to hack on it. Here are some results, click through for larger images:

Normal 3D view

Normal 3D view

Only give depth to links

Only give depth to links

Only give depth to links going off-site

Only give depth to links going off-site

Only give depth to elements that have a different style on hover

Only give depth to elements that have a different style on hover

This is all achieved with some changes to Firefox itself to make Tilt handle more generic visualisations along with an extension that then overrides Tilt’s default visualisation. Because the extension has access to everything Firefox knows about the webpage it can use some interested sources of data about the page, including those not found in the DOM. This one I particularly like, it makes the element’s depth proportional to the number of attached DOM event listeners:

Give depth to elements based on the number of attached event listeners

Give depth to elements based on the number of attached event listeners

Just look at that search box, and what’s up with the two buttons having different height?

The code just calls a JS function to get the height for each element displayed in 3D view. It’s really easy to use DOM functions to highlight different things about the elements and while I think some of the examples I made are interesting I think it will be more interesting to just let web-devs come up with and share their own visualisations. To that end I also demoed using scratchpad to write whatever function you like to control the visualisation. You can see a screencast of it in action.

Something that struck me towards the end of the week is that it could be awesome to pair this up with external sources of data like analytics. What about being able to view your page with links given depth proportional to how often users click them? Seems like an awesome way to really understand where your users are going and maybe why.

I’m hoping to get the changes to Firefox landed soon maybe with an additional patch to properly support extensibility of Tilt, right now the extension works by replacing a function in a JSM which is pretty hacky, but it wouldn’t be difficult to make it nicer than that. After that I’ll be interested to see what visualisation ideas others come up with.